Archetypal Enemies Exist in All Religions

Some religious leaders use language which others use to justify terror. These leaders should instead take responsibility for teaching people how to critically interpret religious texts. “The Day of Judgement will not come about until you fight the Jews. The Jew will hide behind stones and trees. The stones and trees will shout: ‘O Muslims,… Read more »

This Week in South Sudan – Week 25

Tuesday 20 June David Shearer, UN Special Representative for South Sudan and Head of UNMISS says fragmentation of the conflict makes sustainable peace more elusive. Meanwhile the UN calls on South Sudan’s leaders to take greater responsibility for their people. The former SPLA chief of general staff, General Paul Malong Awan said he would not… Read more »

Why Don’t All Migrants Return in Times of Crisis?

In the early 2000s, numerous migrants arrived in Spain, attracted by the prospects of finding a job in the country’s booming economy. They quickly grew to represent 11% of the total population in 2008, from 2% in 2000. But when the financial crisis hit and Spain topped Europe’s unemployment rates, immigrants became disproportionately affected –… Read more »

A PhD by Publication Allows You to Write for Real and Varied Audiences, Inviting Intellectual Exchanges that Benefit your Research

A PhD by publication requires doctoral candidates to submit a set of papers for peer-reviewed journals plus an integrating chapter, rather than the more traditional doctoral dissertation. This remains a less common, sometimes frowned-upon model, but Jørgen Carling outlines eight reasons why a PhD by publication might be a good option. It allows you to… Read more »

This Week in South Sudan – Week 24

Monday 12 June Following the extra-ordinary summit in Addis Ababa, IGAD reiterated that the full implementation of ARCASS is the only way forward, and announced it will convene a High-level Revitalization Forum. President Salva Kiir’s absence has been criticised by some commentators as problematic, while the Enough Project urged for a radical rethink of the… Read more »

The Myth of ICT’s Protective Effect in Mass Atrocity Response

Information Communication Technologies (ICTs) are now being employed as a standard part of mass atrocity response, evidence collection, and research by non-governmental organizations, governments, and the private sector. Deployment of these tools and techniques occur for a variety of stated reasons, most notably the ostensible goal of “protecting” vulnerable populations. In a new article published… Read more »

This Week in South Sudan – Week 23

Tuesday 6 June A U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) official is providing forensic assistance in connection with the ongoing trial related to the Terrain Hotel attack in July 2016. The trial has been adjourned until 20 June. Wednesday 7 June Al Jazeera video-report on Ana Taban artists “Young artists hope art can relieve suffering… Read more »

This Week in South Sudan – Week 22

Monday 29 May General Frank Mushyo Kamanzi from Uganda arrived in South Sudan to assume his position as the new UNMISS Force Commander. Alleged clashes between government soldiers and SPLA (IO) in Nasser town, Upper Nile State. Tuesday 30 May The military court prosecution against 13-20 SPLA soldiers commenced in Juba, in what is considered… Read more »

The Kurdish Peace Process in Turkey and Ontological Insecurity

From 2009 to 2015, Turkey’s Kurdish issue has been marked by successive initiatives aiming to end violence. However, following the June 2015 elections in Turkey, the peace process abruptly came to a halt, with the conflict escalating almost on a daily basis with armed confrontations between the PKK and the Turkish military and police forces…. Read more »

An overview: South Sudan’s civil war

Note to the reader: This blog post is intended for readers who desire a short introduction to current affairs in South Sudan. The text is an adaptation of a brief originally written in Norwegian and titled “Sør-Sudan: fra fest til katastrofe”. That brief is intended for a secondary school audience and was published in May… Read more »